UV Eye Protection During Winter
Did you know that a day on the slopes can cause more damage to your eyes than a weekend at the beach? While many people store their sunglasses away for winter, UV protection is vital to protect your eyes all year. Winter is hard on the eyes: In wintery conditions, UV rays can be emitted from above and below. While snow reflects almost 80% of the sun's radiation, beach sand only reflects 15%. Your UV exposure increases by nearly two-thirds when you ski or snowboard. Higher altitudes on ski slopes mean thinner air, allowing more ultraviolet radiation to enter the atmosphere. For every 1,312 feet in altitude, UV radiation increases by 3 percent. Mountain exposures can also increase by more than 15%. Winter weather can look cloudy, as visible light is dimmed while UV light is still visible. Many people forget to protect their eyes by putting away their sunglasses. How to protect your eyes: Many winter sports enthusiasts are unaware of the importance of protecting their eyes from the sun's damaging rays. Researchers found that most snowboarders and skiers did not take any precautions against the sun, despite being exposed to extremely high levels of UV radiation in a study published in the Archives of Dermatology. Since the first time that winter sports glasses were made from caribou antlers, protection has improved dramatically. The Vision Council recommends using polarized coatings or mirrors with amber tints to enhance contrast and reduce the glare from the snow. Even if you don't ski or snowboard, sunglasses are still important. You shouldn't just wear a pair of sunglasses. It will help if you are looking for lenses that block UVB and UVA rays 99-100% and that comply with ANSI Z80.3 blocking requirements. Contacts with UV blockers can't replace sunglasses. However, lenses that offer greater protection are better than contacts without them. CooperVision's clarity and Avaira have silicone hydrogel with UV blocking. Winter can bring on short-term problems like Photokeratities (Snow Blindness), but long-term damage to your eyes may occur, such as macular degeneration and cataracts. You can protect your eyes all year long by wearing the right protective eyewear While snow reflects almost 80% of the sun's radiation, beach sand only reflects 15%. Your UV exposure increases by nearly two-thirds when you ski or snowboard. Higher altitudes on ski slopes mean thinner air, allowing more ultraviolet radiation to enter the atmosphere. For every 1,312 feet in altitude, UV radiation increases by 3 percent. Mountain exposures can also increase by more than 15%. Winter weather can look cloudy, as visible light is dimmed while UV light is still visible. Many people forget to protect their eyes by putting away their sunglasses...

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