Winter Eye Protection
While you may have always worn your sunglasses in the summer, did you know they should also be worn in winter? Even though you might think the sun is less powerful in winter, it isn't. The sun can be farther from Earth during winter, but some winter conditions can make UV rays more harmful. Your eyes can be damaged by the sun's reflection on fresh snow or ice. Long-term damage to your eyes can result from prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays, such as macular degeneration, snow blindness, and cataracts. It would help if you had winter protection for your eyes, as the skin around them can be particularly vulnerable to certain skin cancers. Did you know that higher altitudes allow for more light to pass through? Winter eye protection is essential for those who ski in the mountains. For every 400m (or 1,312 feet) elevation, UV radiation rises by 3%. Around 80% of the UV light is reflected from snow and clouds on cloudy days. Wear sunglasses that wrap around your eyes or goggles recommended by an eye doctor to protect your eyes. Contact lenses give you more options, as you don't need to worry about prescription lenses being in contact with your eyewear. The additional benefit of contact lenses is that they can be incorporated with UV-blocking optical material. These materials can provide extra protection from UV rays, even if sunglasses and hats do not block them. CooperVision's Avaira contacts are made of silicone hydrogel with UV blocking. Ask your eye doctor for more information on winter eye protection. The Vision Council offers more information on winter eye protection in a helpful article titled Sunglasses For Snow Sports. Even though you might think the sun is less powerful in winter, it isn't. The sun can be farther from Earth during winter, but some winter conditions can make UV rays more harmful. Your eyes can be damaged by the sun's reflection on fresh snow or ice. Long-term damage to your eyes can result from prolonged exposure to ultraviolet rays, such as macular degeneration, snow blindness, and cataracts. It would help if you had winter protection for your eyes, as the skin around them can be particularly vulnerable to certain skin cancers. Did you know that higher altitudes allow for more light to pass through? Winter eye protection is essential for those who ski in the mountains. For every 400m (or 1,312 feet) elevation, UV radiation rises by 3%. Around 80% of the UV light is reflected from snow and clouds on cloudy days. Wear sunglasses that wrap around your eyes or goggles recommended by an eye doctor to protect your eyes. Contact lenses give you more options, as you don't need to worry about prescription lenses being in contact with your eyewear. The additional benefit of contact lenses is that they can be incorporated with UV-blocking optical material. These materials can provide extra protection from UV rays, even if sunglasses and hats do not block them. CooperVision's Avaira contacts are made of silicone hydrogel with UV blocking.

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